Achieving child literacy and numeracy in the world’s poorest areas: Evidence from rural Guinea Bissau

Achieving child literacy and numeracy in the world’s poorest areas: Evidence from rural Guinea Bissau

Achieving child literacy and numeracy in the world’s poorest areas: Evidence from rural Guinea Bissau 1640 938 HANGAR49

Ila Fazzio, Alex Eble, Robin Lumsdaine, Peter Boone, Baboucarr Bouy, Pei-tseng Jenny Hsieh, Chitra Jayanty, Simon Johnson, Filipa Silva 16 December 2020

Achieving universal basic literacy and numeracy has long been a policy goal for development agencies working in areas of extreme poverty. This column presents evidence from a bundled intervention in rural Guinea Bissau which suggests that targeted education policies can have substantial positive effects on children’s schooling outcomes. Such policies could play a key role in helping people ‘escape’ the poverty trap, as the education gains from such interventions elevate local children’s attainment levels far beyond those found in neighboring areas.

 

5 Minute Read
Achieving child literacy and numeracy in the world’s poorest areas: Evidence from rural Guinea Bissau

Children in many extremely poor, remote regions are growing up illiterate and innumerate despite high reported school enrolment ratios (Pritchett 2013, Glewwe and Muralidharan 2016)…

READ THE FULL ARTICLE